Full Snow Moon

In Northern Hemisphere February used to be the month of heaviest snowfall. Hence the February Full Moon is called traditionally Full Snow Moon.

Other names of February Full Moon: Bald Eagle Moon / Eagle Moon, Ojibwe Bear Moon, Tlingit Black Bear Moon, Raccoon Moon, Groundhog Moon, Goose Moon, Bony Moon and Hungry Moon.

February 26, 2021 is also a day of Chinese Lantern Festival – a culmination of Chinese New Year celebrations.


Full Moon rising on 26th February 2021 in Dubai, UAE.


Full Moon on 26th February 2021 in Dubai, UAE.


See also:

Full Moons in 2021: Full Wolf Moon

Full Moons in 2020: January Full Moon | February Full Moon in the clouds | March Worm Supermoon | April Pink Supermoon | May Flower Supermoon |   June Strawberry Moon and penumbral eclipse | July Buck Moon | August Sturgeon Moon | September Corn Moon | October Harvest Moon | Once in a Blue MoonFull Beaver Moon

Full Moons in 2019: Full Beaver Moon


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Full Wolf Moon

During January the wolves were believed to howl more often than other parts of the year. That is why the Full Moon of this winter month was called traditionally Full Wolf Moon. Other names of January Full Moon: Hunger Moon, Frost Moon, Snow Moon, Severe Moon.


Full Moon on 28th January 2021 in Dubai, UAE.


Full Moon rising above Dubai suburbs on 29th January 2021.


See also:

Full Moons in 2020: January Full Moon | February Full Moon in the clouds | March Worm Supermoon | April Pink Supermoon | May Flower Supermoon |   June Strawberry Moon and penumbral eclipse | July Buck Moon | August Sturgeon Moon | September Corn Moon | October Harvest Moon | Once in a Blue MoonFull Beaver Moon

Full Moons in 2019: Full Beaver Moon


UAE on 40thousandkm.com Dubai on 40thousandkm.com

Christmas Star: The Great Conjunction 2020

The great conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn took place on 21st December at 13:22 GMT. In the photos below: Jupiter (brighter) and Saturn at around 19:00 GMT (and the beautiful Moon) in Cape Town, South Africa.

Every 20 years Jupiter and Saturn pass close to each other and this is called “the great conjuction”. This year however the distance between them is the smallest since 1623. Those two planets – observed with naked eye – looked like a one bright star (“Christmas star”). For the observers on Earth they were only 0.1 degrees apart (however Saturn was twice as far from our planet as Jupiter). The next such exceptional great conjunction will be in 2080 and then in 2417 and 2477…





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